full private practice

Counseling Supervision vs Private Practice Coaching: The Differences You Need to Know

Counseling Supervision vs Business Coaching for Therapists | Private Practice Coach | Supervision in Counseling

Supervision vs Counseling

Doing great work in private practice requires support.  Sometimes you need a great counseling supervision to think through a problem, and other times you need to hire a private practice business coach.  

Knowing which kind of support you need isn't always easy to determine.  I outlined a few key differences below to help you find what you need to grow your counseling practice.  

Counseling Supervision

A counseling supervisor provides consultation to new therapists. They may also advise licensed practitioners in difficult or unique situations.  Supervisors might do any of the following:

  • walk you through professional ethics concerns 

  • help you track pre-licensure hours

  • consult on stuck or tricky cases

  • assist in psychotherapy case consultation

  • advise on methods for treatment with therapy clients

  • support you through countertransference or personal dilemmas that arise in session

  • review diagnostic codes, insurance paneling, or client files

  • review for your licensing exams

  • navigate conversations with your licensing board

Counseling supervisors are ultimately responsible for the well-being of their supervisee's clients.  They keep record of your meetings to help ensure you're on the right track.  As experienced professionals, they also help new counselors develop a professional identity.

This role is critical to success as a new practitioner so it is essential you find a well-qualified supervisor who is a good fit for your work.  I recommend interviewing a few supervisors to assess their fit for your work and professional growth.  Here are a few questions I ask to interview supervisors before working with them:

  • Are you credentialed to provide the kind of supervision I need?

  • Do your specializations and trainings align with my interests and passions in private practice?

  • How do you structure supervision meetings?  How should I prepare for our work together?

  • How often will you review my files, listen to recorded sessions, or view videos of my work for feedback?

  • What can I expect regarding our contact outside of face to face meetings?  What if I need support after hours? 

  • How do you measure success in counseling work?  How do you assess growth in practitioners?

  • What motivates you to work as a supervisor? What have been some of your greatest successes in supervision?  What is your greatest challenge?

Read more about counseling supervision on the APA website

Just like a counseling relationship, it's  imperative you have a strong, trusting relationship with your supervisor. If you feel you can’t tell them things, it may be time to move on. You can change supervisors whenever you like (just be sure to update your licensing board). Your professional development is the key focus here.

Private Practice Coaching

But being a trained clinical supervisor doesn't always mean you know anything about creating a sustainable business in private practice.  Hiring a private practice coach is all about reaching the right clients, marketing online, growing your income, and running a small business in a modern world.  

Coaching is different from supervision in a few key ways:

  • Coaching is not a regulated field, so your coach may not have any certification or training.

  • Coaching is focused on your practice business growth and identity as a business person- not your in-session therapeutic work (diagnostics and stuck cases). 

  • Coaching will not meet your requirements for supervision if you are a pre-licensed or intern counselor (ethics and training requirements). 

  • Coaches can practice beyond state lines so you can meet with one from anywhere if you respect their work. 

Unlike supervision, coaching will help you:

  • Effectively reach the right clients through social media, blogging, and other marketing strategy

  • Develop an integrity-based business plan

  • Create a financial plan for your therapy business to make a decent counseling income

  • Use your time wisely in growing your business by choosing a clear plan

  • Make running a psychotherapy business easier with useful resources, plans, and tools

  • Build an authentic online presence (social media, website, videos etc)

  • Understand Search Engine Optimization (SEO) or how to get found on google

  • Overcome money blocks and limited thinking about practice growth

Read more about effective business coaching on Forbes.com

If you hire a business coach for private practice, you want to know they are credible and can be trusted with your work.  Because the field of coaching is wide open there are a lot of folks offering coaching services with varying degrees of training.  

Similar to supervision, hiring a coach means taking your counseling business seriously.  It's really important you interview a few coaches to assess their skills and match for your private practice needs.  Here are a few questions I recommend asking:

  • What qualifies you to coach private practice therapists?  Do you have any coaching certifications or training?

  • Have you built or run a financially sustainable private practice?

  • What formal training do you have in marketing, business, or social media?

  • What can I expect regarding our contact outside of face to face meetings?  What if I need support after hours? 

  • How do you assess growth in the business of counseling?

  • What motivates you to work as a coach? What have been some of your greatest successes in coaching?  What is your greatest challenge?

  • What specific business-building issues have you helped previous coaching clients overcome?

I believe if you take your private practice business seriously you will require the services of both a supervisor and a coach.  Find supervisors near you by checking with your local licensing board.  Find a coach through the International Coach Federation website, or give me a call for a consultation and I can support you or refer you to another coach.  


Gina Senarighi is a business coach for therapists, social media strategist, and author. With careful planning and strategic marketing, in under one year she lead three thriving therapy practices.  

Gina has quickly become a trusted voice on authenticity in marketing as an author, teacher, and guest expert on local and national media. 

Due to her successes in therapy business she's been coaching other therapists to grow their counseling practices with ease and integrity.   

Join her Daring Way for Therapists Retreat or online coaching community for therapists and start building the practice of your dreams.

30 Reasons to Hire a Private Practice Business Coach

Reasons to Hire a Counseling Practice Coach | Business Coach for Therapists

Not every therapist understands how hiring a business coach can improve private practice.  Here's a quick list of thirty reasons you might hire a coach in private practice:

  1. You want to help more clients

  2. The mere idea of putting your face on a website scares the heck out of you

  3. You're super overwhelmed by technology

  4. You moved to a new area and are starting over

  5. Leaving agency work behind seems like a far off dream

  6. You worry you won't get any clients if you start a private practice

  7. You want to make more money in private practice

  8. Building a website sounds like a drag

  9. Social media intimidates you

  10. You have trouble staying focused on business tasks

  11. You want an accountability partner to help you keep on track

  12. You want support for your writing

  13. It's time to switch focus in your counseling practice

  14. You're ready to take your private practice seriously

  15. Counseling is great, but you want additional income streams

  16. You know hat you need to do, but somehow manage to put it off every time

  17. You want to market your work without sounding salesy

  18. There's so much great general information out there but you want help applying it to your dream clients

  19. You don't know what to write on your site

  20. You want sustainable private practice income to fill the gaps on slow weeks

  21. Your goal is a full private practice

  22. You want to podcast but starting one is daunting

  23. Trying to understand SEO gives you a headache

  24. Your intakes have slowed (or stopped)

  25. Your clients aren't paying you enough

  26. There are already so many therapists out there you worry you won't stand out

  27. Imposter syndrome sets in and says "Who do you think you are?" every time you think about making a private practice website

  28. You want more credibility and notoriety

  29. You have tried everything you can think of and still there's no traffic on your website

  30. You want greater confidence talking about your therapy business at networking events

If you want help from a community of supportive therapists, join the private Authentic Marketing for Therapists in Private Practice facebook group here so we can help your business grow!


Gina Senarighi is a business coach for therapists, social media strategist, and author. With careful planning and strategic marketing, in under one year she lead three thriving therapy practices.  

Gina has quickly become a trusted voice on authenticity in marketing as an author, teacher, and guest expert on local and national media. 

Due to her successes in therapy business she's been coaching other therapists to grow their counseling practices with ease and integrity.   

Join her Daring Way for Therapists Retreat or online coaching community for therapists and start building the practice of your dreams.

Six Resources for Online Counseling in Private Practice

Six Essential Resources to Provide Online Counseling | Virtual Counseling | HIPPA Online Counseling

So you're considering offering online counseling to grow your private practice.  This can be a great way to offer you and your clients some flexibility and ease of access to services.

But before you begin there are a few considerations and resources you're going to want to check out to be sure you're offering confidential and ethical services.  

Your Starting Place for All Things New and Exciting

As with any major change in your practice moving online has specific implications depending on where you are practicing.  Each US state and many national countries have their own unique provisions related to virtual counseling.  Without guidance it can get confusing so find the Licensing Board in your area to start on the right path.  

I highly recommend reading more on HIPPA compliance and ethics concerns from Roy Huggins at Person-Centered Tech.

Distance Counseling Training and Online Therapy Certifications

Before starting services you might want to consider getting some real training in the considerations, ethics, and technology implications for you and your clients.  Both the Zur Institute and the Center for Credentialing and Education offer Distance Credentialed Counselor Certifications to help you really know what you're doing.   

HIPPA-Ready Video Chat Platforms for Online Counseling

Once you have checked with your board and feel equipped with training there are HIPPA compliant platforms to consider as you begin online counseling.  It is essential to use a service that takes client privacy seriously.  

Check out the list below for three options on pricing and features:

Combating Isolation

Before you begin actual client work you might want to consider getting professional support in the form of supervision (check with your licensing board for credentialed supervisors in your area) and collegial community.  

There are many online professional groups for therapists working in this arena and finding one can be incredibly useful for your long-term plans in the field of online counseling.  

Best of luck to you on this new online endeavor!


Gina Senarighi is a business coach for therapists, social media strategist, and author. With careful planning and strategic marketing, in under one year she lead three thriving therapy practices.  

Gina has quickly become a trusted voice on authenticity in marketing as an author, teacher, and guest expert on local and national media. 

Due to her successes in therapy business she's been coaching other therapists to grow their counseling practices with ease and integrity.   

Join her Daring Way for Therapists Retreat or online coaching community for therapists and start building the practice of your dreams.

How to Use Facebook Groups to Increase Therapy Client Referrals

Increase Therapy Client Referrals with Counseling Facebook Groups | Business Coaching for Therapists

Becoming an active member of social media groups is one way to increase credibility and referrals among mental health practitioners. It's the new business networking event- just without physical business cards.

It's pretty easy to make connections all over the globe and establish yourself as knowledgeable and reliable in private practice through facebook networking.  However, if you're not careful about HOW you write your introductions and responses you could be missing out on referrals and collaboration opportunities.

There are four important pieces of information that get left out in the online networking world. Be sure to include these to make the most of your online group memberships.

Four elements of a successful facebook group introduction for therapists:

1. My actual name (not my facebook alias) so other practitioners can find me, contact me, look me up for referrals

  • "My non-facebook name is Gina Senarighi"
  • "Offline I practice as Gina Senarighi"
  • "My name at work is Gina Senarighi"

2. My practice's geographic location so other practitioners know if clients are near me for better referrals

  • "I practice in Southeast Portland, Or"
  • "I have an office in University District and Green Lake neighborhoods in Seattle WA"
  • "I am moving to Pasadena, CA and could use help connecting with more clients and practitioners in the area."

3. A one sentence description of my ideal client

  • "I love working with women executives who are considering parenthood."
  • "I work with polyamorous couples"
  • "I love helping female combat vets return to life in the states"
  • "I help families of teens with autism navigate the healthcare system"

4. A link to your private practice website and facebook page (again, so referral sources can find you easily.

  • "You can read more about my work at www.amplifiedgood.com"
  • "Check out my new blog on my private practice site www.uncommonlovepdx.com"
  • "I have a few resources for clients in my focus area on my site www.amplifiedgood.com"

If you've already sent an introduction and your self critic is in full alarm "Oh no!  I did it wrong!"  Don't worry.  You can always re-introduce yourself.  Try something like this:

"Hi!  I wanted to send a quick hello to all of you to re-introduce my practice.  My offline name is Gina Senarighi, and I work with couples considering opening their relationships in Portland, Oregon and online.  If you're interested in learning more about these couples check out my website: www.uncommonlovepdx.com or give me a call- I love talking with other therapists about the work I do!"  

It's that simple.  

Making it as easy as possible for others to refer to you can greatly improve the referrals you receive through online networking groups.

Join the Authentic Marketing for Private Practice Facebook Group and try it out how!


Gina Senarighi is a business coach for therapists, social media strategist, and author. With careful planning and strategic marketing, in under one year she lead three thriving therapy practices.  

Gina has quickly become a trusted voice on authenticity in marketing as an author, teacher, and guest expert on local and national media. 

Due to her successes in therapy business she's been coaching other therapists to grow their counseling practices with ease and integrity.   

Join her Daring Way for Therapists Retreat or online coaching community for therapists and start building the practice of your dreams.

Get Clients From Your Site to Your Counseling Office

More Counseling Clients on the Couch | Amplified Practice Business Coach for Therapists

Okay, so you know having a website is critical to private practice success in a modern world, but how do you get website traffic to convert into office visits with paying clients?


A clear, inviting site is vital- but there are a few spots many of us miss in developing therapist websites.  

If you have your site set up, here are the key areas you can clean up in a couple minutes to bring more traffic in your door:  

 


Check your contact information

The point of a site is to get folks to contact you- right?  Let's make sure it's super easy for them.

This step is simple (but often overlooked): make sure your contact information is correct and easily visible on every page of your site. Yes, every single page- we want them to be able to contact you whenever they are ready- without clicking through to other pages.

Having a google maps link available will also help clients find you. If you haven't made one before there's an easy tutorial here.

Use a scheduling link

Remember, clients are often in crisis when they contact us so we want to make it as easy as possible for clients to move from our site to an appointment.  Asking them to get out their phones to type in a number is too much for many modern clients.  

Using an online scheduling tool to help clients say yes to an initial session with ease. I use Acuity Scheduling for my free screening consultations (before they become clients) but there are many other tools (some of which are HIPPA compliant and will also handle your billing and case files).

Use client language

Clients want to know how you can help them.  Use their language instead of jargon about your training or therapeutic orientation to help them know clearly and easily what you can offer and how you help.

Make your offering clear

Most clients will spend under 10 seconds on a site before deciding if they want more information- or leaving to check another therapist's site.  Be sure your homepage clearly says you offer counseling, or therapy in a specific form (therapy for teens, couples counseling, premarital consultations, christian counseling etc).  

If it's easy to understand quickly clients will be far more likely to explore your site for more information (and set up a consultation).  

Clean up your about page

The about page is the most visited page on most therapists' sites.  Use this page to get clear by writing from the client's perspective, tell them what makes you passionate about this work and what makes your work unique.   

If you outline your training and education make sure it's clear to the client how your training applies to helping them (for more on what to write on your site click here).  

Answer the phone

Here's where a lot of therapists miss potential clients.  If they call you, they want to see you- set a time near the end of each day and be sure you return each and every call.  

Here's a rule of thumb: if you don't have time to return calls, you don't have time to take new clients.  

Follow up

Finally, follow up is one of the places many therapists miss opportunities with new clients.  If you miss a call, or someone doesn't give a call back, do take the time to reach out one more time just to be sure they have the referrals they need, or to let them know you have a new opening.  

I can't tell you how many of my clients have appreciated this follow up and have told me how few therapists actually followed up with them.  Lots of clients are out their writing for a call back, if you are the therapist who does you will have an advantage in filling your caseload.

 

There you have it- seven simple tips to fill your couch.  Take a few minutes this week to tune up your site and notice how it helps connect clients to your work in the coming months.  

If you want further help building your private practice site, or developing a purposeful practice schedule a free consultation here.  I am always happy to talk with other providers to help you build your business.



Private Practice Marketing | Marketing plan for therapists

Gina Senarighi is a business coach for therapists, social media strategist, and author. With careful planning and strategic marketing, in under one year she lead three thriving therapy practices.  

Gina has quickly become a trusted voice on authenticity in marketing as an author, teacher, and guest expert on local and national media. 

Due to her successes in therapy business she's been coaching other therapists to grow their counseling practices with ease and integrity.   

Join her Daring Way for Therapists Retreat or online coaching community for therapists and start building the practice of your dreams.

Easy Counseling Blog Post Ideas

Do you feel stuck coming up with blog post topics?

Coming up with blog topics out of thin air can be totally overwhelming.  But if you have a resource to pull great ideas from regularly writing can be so much easier. 

Here are four places I draw blog topic inspiration from when I sit down to write my blogs:

1. My Blog Topics Bookmarks Folder

When I first started blogging I created a bookmarks folder in my browser where I keep what I call "rewrites." These are blog posts I read from others that appeal to my ideal client base.  I often read them and think, "Thats great" or "I wish they would have included ___"

I keep these handy- not to plagiarize, but so that I can draw inspiration from them or reference them in my own writing.

2. Blog Topics in my Old School Notebook

I also carry a small notebook with me to capture ideas on the go.  Truthfully, this notebook carries more than just a blog list, but having it near means when inspiration strikes in conversation, in a movie, or while listening to the radio, I can catch it to write later. 

Then when I have time to write I flip through the notebook to write blogs or add them to the next source: Blog Drafts.

3. Blog Drafts

Odds are whichever blog platform you're using has an option to save blog drafts.  These are blogs you have partially written- but aren't ready to share with the world.  

I keep a running list of blog titles and/or short outlines in my blog drafts folder and draw from them when it's time to start writing.

4. Editorial Calendar

Finally, I use my Editorial Calendar tool as a framework or guide to keep all these ideas organized.  It doesn't make sense to write about seasonal affective disorder during July, or holiday stress in May.  

By entering client interests in this tool I can plan ahead to make sure my blogs are timed well for my clients' needs and interests.

(if you would like a free Editorial Calendar download just click here)

There you have it- four easy ways to generate blog post ideas regularly.  Check out the video to hear more, or hop over to the Authentic Marketing for Therapists private Facebook group to share ideas with other therapists.


Gina Senarighi | Successful private practice | full practice

Gina Senarighi is a business coach for therapists, social media strategist, and author. With careful planning and strategic marketing, in under one year she lead three thriving therapy practices.  

Gina has quickly become a trusted voice on authenticity in marketing as an author, teacher, and guest expert on local and national media. 

Due to her successes in therapy business she's been coaching other therapists to grow their counseling practices with ease and integrity.   

Join her Daring Way for Therapists Retreat or online coaching community for therapists and start building the practice of your dreams.

Reframing Money: Changing Your Thoughts to Build a Profitable Practice

Profitable Private Practice | Amplified Practice Authentic Marketing & Business Coaching for Therapists

One of the greater successes in my practice came to me as a mindset shift.  I noticed how often I sat in a place of fear and scarcity and I knew I didn't want to operate my counseling practice from that headspace.  

It felt out of integrity for me to invite clients to work through their fears if I wasn't facing my own.

It was easy for me to see one of the easiest targets for fear in my life was around money.  This is probably true for many small business owners, but I think it is unique to therapists in many ways.  Because our work is so often an extension of ourselves, it is especially challenging to untangle our worth from our work, and our worth from our income.

I was referred to Kate Northrup by my own therapy business coach when I started working on my money blocks in practice.  Kate has created a really unique approach to financial abundance that aligns spirituality, gratitude, and serious reframe to her clients' relationship with money.  

I watched her Wanderlust Speakeasy talk years ago and it has transformed the way I think and interact with money in my practice.  Many other therapists have commented on my financial approach- calling it generous, or abundance-minded, but always noting how little space I allow for fear around money.  

I am including Kate's talk below because I believe this mindset is critical to transforming our work as therapists in private practice, our income in counseling practice, and our relationships with clients.  When we are troubled in our own relationship with finances we are far less likely to talk about it easily with clients (and far more likely to get caught up in serious transference).  

Critical Reframes About Money for Therapists

I'll outline my favorite points from Kate's talk below.  These have had significant impact on my practice and my work with clients around money.  

Notice what shows up for you ask you watch the video and leave a comment letting me know how this connects with your own work- I would love to hear from you!

Writing out your money truths

I love three of the tools Kate outlines here.  First, she talks about creating lists around financial expansiveness, and restrictions.  

I created a worksheet for you to complete this activity- you can download it here.

Thinking more specifically about our financial stuck points creates opportunities for us to change our behavior patterns around money.  

Where are your private practice financial leaks?

Kate also talks about writing out financial agreements in her business partnership with her mom.  Although her situation is very different, I cannot tell you how many of the counselors I work with do not write out the payment agreements with clients (especially sliding scale clients).  Not only does this create real liability for your counseling practice- it moves you further from the financial clarity you (and your clients) need.  

Take a minute today to write out a list of your financial agreements- do you have them in writing?  Can you create agreements with these clients and partners in the next two weeks?

The final exercise Kate mentions very quickly is about writing out a list of places in your life where you feel financial freedom.  One of the biggest money blocks for many folks in mental health is not having an idea of what financial success might feel like.  Knowing what brings us excitement and pleasure around money- again with specificity- can help us get in bring that vision closer to reality.  


Reframing your vision of private practice profitability 

Truthfully, I cannot say enough about the power of creating a clear vision of profitability and financial security.  I spend a lot of time envisioning what I want and getting clear about the action steps I want to get there.  

However, sometimes (as Kate says in the video) I don't actually want to do the work to get there.  I would love to have a clinic and a research institute named after me- but do I want to do the work to get there?  Nope.  So I need to make sure my vision is something I am willing to do the work for.  


Let your money shame out in the light

"Shame cannot survive empathy"  - Brene Brown

It's true, shame likes to keep us isolated, quiet, and small.  By telling the truth about our money to empathetic folks (the folks who love us not in spite of our imperfections, but along with them) we create space for empathy and learning.  

Early in my practice I started a mastermind group for therapists focused on financial wellness.  Kate suggests finding a group of friends to talk through money problems with.  Bringing our money concerns out in a shame-free environment can be incredibly healing and empowering.  

Who do you trust and respect enough to invite to this conversation?  

Sharing with empathetic friends and colleagues also creates space for self-compassion.  As therapists we know shame is never a motivator for behavior change- and yet many of us shame ourselves about money all the time.  

Self compassion means giving ourselves kindness- speaking to ourselves the way we would a loved one.  

How would your financial experience be different if you treated yourself with kindness?


Financial sustainability as a spiritual practice


I love Kate's outlook on money as energy exchange, gratitude, generosity, and abundance.  Many of the therapists I work with see financial wealth as truly separate from meaningful connection to clients.  Kate's reframe helps me see the exchange of energy in money, care, and expertise in much better balance.  I hope it helps you in your work as well.  

Again, let me know what you think of this video here, or in the Authentic Marketing for Therapists private Facebook group.  I look forward to hearing from you!  



coaching for therapists | limiting belief therapist

Gina Senarighi is a business coach for therapists, social media strategist, and author. With careful planning and strategic marketing, in under one year she lead three thriving therapy practices.  

Gina has quickly become a trusted voice on authenticity in marketing as an author, teacher, and guest expert on local and national media. 

Due to her successes in therapy business she's been coaching other therapists to grow their counseling practices with ease and integrity.   

Join her Daring Way for Therapists Retreat or online coaching community for therapists and start building the practice of your dreams.

What to Write on Your Counseling Practice Website

 
 
Private Practice Website Copy| Amplified Practice Authentic Marketing & Business Coaching for Therapists

Coming up with fresh and engaging content for a site can be a real challenge.  Two important mindshifts really helped me get mine up and running.  

What to know before writing for your private practice site

First, it's important to remember a good website is a space of constant evolution- because you and your therapy practice are in constant evolution!  This doesn't mean you have to keep re-writing it forever, but it does mean everything you write is a draft.  You will continue to add material and edit over time.  

Second there are a few pages that will get the most traffic on your counseling practice site, so you can concentrate your energy there and build on more content later.  You really want to focus most on your home, about, and services pages.  Make it as easy for clients to know what you offer and how to connect with you on these pages and you are more than halfway there! 

A strong therapist website will prioritize these questions above all:

Make sure every potential therapy client who visits your site can answer these questions when they see your counseling website.

  • Do you care?
  • Can I trust you?
  • Do you understand?
  • Can you help me?

The Big Therapy Website Picture

Every page you share on a website for therapists should clearly answer these questions:

  • How do I contact you?
  • What do you want me to do? ("schedule a free consultation" or "download my free guide")
  • Where are you located?
  • What legal resources might I need here? (privacy, terms, and website disclosure information)

The Psychotherapy About Page

Don't get tricked here! This webpage isn't really about you- it's about how you can help!

  • How does your training help me?
  • How does your background influence what sessions look like?
  • What can I expect from you?
  • What is unique about you?

Therapist Services Pages:

Your future therapy clients want to know

  • How much does your service cost?
  • How long are your sessions?
  • Where is your office?
  • What days/hours do you offer sessions?

social media for therapists | marketing in private practice  | full private practice

Gina Senarighi is a business coach for therapists, social media strategist, and author. With careful planning and strategic marketing, in under one year she lead three thriving therapy practices.  

Gina has quickly become a trusted voice on authenticity in marketing as an author, teacher, and guest expert on local and national media. 

Due to her successes in therapy business she's been coaching other therapists to grow their counseling practices with ease and integrity.   

Join her Daring Way for Therapists Retreat or online coaching community for therapists and start building the practice of your dreams.